PUPPY FOOD (7 items)

The nutritional needs of a puppy

Puppies are typically weaned off their mother’s milk from around the age of 8 weeks. The goal of feeding growing puppies is to lay the foundation for a healthy adulthood. Proper nutrition is required to achieve healthy growth, optimise immune function and minimise the potential for obesity and diseases. It’s important to note that a puppy’s nutritional needs are very different from an adult dog. Our nutrient rich and highly palatable puppy foods are also suitable for pregnant/nursing mums.

Some of the basic components necessary to the health and growth of a puppy are water, calories, protein, fats, vitamins and minerals.

Water

Water is the most vital nutrient for all mammals and makes up 75% of the body mass at birth. It has a major role in the functions of the body including the transportation and delivery of nutrients, regulation of body temperature and lubrication of joints, eyes and inner ear. If a puppy does not receive enough water then it will start to show signs of dehydration such as lethargy and dry skin.

Calories

One of the most important factors of a puppy’s diet is to ensure that there is a large number of calories that can fit into a small stomach. It is advised to feed puppies little of often which helps to fuel them until their next feed.

Protein

Protein provides amino acids which are the building blocks to growth. Puppies require significantly more protein than adult dogs and this is particularly important during the rapid growth phase up to 14 weeks of age. An insufficient supply of protein can lead to poor growth and development.

Fats

This is an important source of energy for fuelling growth. It is estimated that fat has approximately twice as many calories per gram compared with protein or carbohydrates, making this an ideal component of a puppy recipe.

Vitamins and Minerals

Puppies have specific vitamin and mineral requirements that differ from adult dogs. They require minerals that help develop healthy bones and teeth such as calcium and phosphorous, as well as zinc that plays a role in skin health and protein metabolism.

Transitioning to adult food

Switching to adult food is recommended when a dog reaches 80% of their full adult size, at which time the owner should consider introducing adult food. This can happen at different times and ages depending on the breed of the dog. It is suggested that small dogs will reach this size first, at the age of around 9 to 10 months. Medium sized breeds continue to grow until they are about a year old. Whilst Large breed puppies reach 80% in size at around 12 to 16 months old. A lot depends on the type and size of dog, 

  • Superfood 65 Puppy Food

    Superfood 65 Puppy Food

    65% Salmon completely grain-free, with a blend of nutritiously beneficial super-foods and rich in essential amino acids, vitamins and minerals to support everyday health and well-being. From just £3.73 per kilo.
    From: £44.75
  • SUPER PREMIUM PUPPY ~ Poultry & rice

    SUPER PREMIUM PUPPY ~ Poultry & rice

    Hypoallergenic with no wheat or wheat gluten, beef, pork, dairy or soya. Nutrient rich with 30% poultry and added salmon oil. A complete food for puppies. From just £2.33 per kilo.
    From: £21.75
  • SUPER PREMIUM LARGE BREED PUPPY ~ Salmon & potato.

    SUPER PREMIUM LARGE BREED PUPPY ~ Salmon & potato.

    Hypoallergenic with no wheat or wheat gluten, beef, pork, dairy or soya. Nutrient rich with 35% salmon and added salmon oil. A complete food for large breed puppies. From just £2.33 per kilo.
    From: £37.50